Don’t Make Your Market Change the Station

Okay, we’re a day late. I could blame my staff for not bothering me enough about it yesterday. I could blame the Ravens and Orioles for playing well enough to distract me. And I could blame the NFL’s replacement refs for just about anything at this point.  I could even blame the cat for eating my notes, but it didn’t work on Mrs. Tucker in third grade so I doubt it would work on you.

The truth is that with the GoDaddy internet meltdown, I used up my Tuesday blog brilliance on Monday and lacked anything that motivated me to write . . . until this morning.

You have probably surmised that I live near Baltimore. I have been an Orioles fan ever since I took this cute blonde to see a game on our first date more than 26 years ago. We celebrate that fact every summer along with our wedding anniversary. I have also become an avid Baltimore Ravens fan, living and dying by their scoreline against the likes of Pittsburgh and New England. So my morning ride to work usually involves a carefully balanced travel mug, a carefully selected curse when the mug tips, and a carefully screened pro-Baltimore sports radio station to take my mind off the stain.

But not this morning. 

My favorite station started talking about an ad on Craig’s list about items of a player’s personal nature stolen from the Minnesota Vikings locker room and now being offered for sale by a former equipment manager. The morning drive radio hosts shared all the disturbing details of the ad about the personal items taken from Brett Favre’s equipment. (We’ll leave the description at that.) The loud click that cut off the host mid-sentence is what it sounds like to lose a customer. I changed the station to the Steve Czaban Show on a competitor’s frequency out of Washington, D.C.

Czaban syndicates his show nationally in the morning and does local radio in the afternoon. So he tweaks his market to make sure he is speaking to his audience. When I changed channels, Czaban was talking about the Orioles beating Tampa the night before (and, thankfully, about the Yankees losing to the Red Sox) to regain a piece of first place in the American League East. More importantly, what he was poignantly not talking about were the squalid endeavors of a perverse equipment manager.

I have followed Czaban’s career for about eight years and know that he is not above pushing the line of propriety on occasion. But any good business needs to know where the line is in the first place. You have to be careful about how you grab the attention of your market. Otherwise, they’ll just change the station and you’ll lose a market to play in at all.

That’s it for today. Hopefully, we’re back on track for Friday since I’m all out of other people to blame. Until then, good luck and good hunting!

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If you’re interested in discussing business law, asset protection, or in hearing my predictions for the Ravens’ season, find out how to get in touch with us at:  TheFisherLawOffice.com. You can also contact us at Facebook.com/FisherLawOffice, on Twitter @thefisherlawoffice, or at LinkedIn.com/in/FisherLawOffice. If you come here just because we sometimes incorporate kittens into the blog, you’d best consult the Arts and Cats Movement. Click image(s) for source.

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One Response to Don’t Make Your Market Change the Station

  1. Pingback: Applelypse Now: The iPhone 5 Delay and the Need for Dedicated Product Release | Planning for Your Wealth

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